Difference between radiocarbon dating dendrochronology

It is also worth noting that the half-life used in carbon dating calculations is 5568 years, the value worked out by chemist Willard Libby, and not the more accurate value of 5730 years, which is known as the Cambridge half-life.Although it is less accurate, the Libby half-life was retained to avoid inconsistencies or errors when comparing carbon-14 test results that were produced before and after the Cambridge half-life was derived.Dating is a technique used in archeology to ascertain the age of artifacts, fossils and other items considered to be valuable by archeologists.

The discovery of this phenomenon was made largely by the pioneering work of de Vries (1958; 1959) and Willis, Tauber, and Munnich (1960), and subsequently has been carried on by more than a dozen radiocarbon laboratories worldwide (for a review see Damon, Lerman, and Long, 1978).This is a method that does not find the age in years but is an effective technique to compare the ages of two or more artifacts, rocks or even sites.It implies that relative dating cannot say conclusively about the true age of an artifact.Though using similar methods, these two techniques differ in certain ways that will be discussed in this article.As the name implies, relative dating can tell which of the two artifacts is older.

Difference between radiocarbon dating dendrochronology